Let it Marinate…

A few years ago, I was at a barbecue with the “guys”. There was lots of meat: chicken, burgers, steak, sausages, etc. I tried to stay away from that barbecued meat (for dietary reasons). But, as the guys were eating away, attacking the meat with no mercy, one of them said to me, “You’ve got to taste this steak; it’s good stuff.” All the others agreed with that statement and pressed me to have a bite.

Curious to see if that steak was going to live up to the hype, I took a small piece. It did! It was indeed good stuff. That steak was easier to cut through that a piece of paper. And when I put the small piece in my mouth, my tastebuds began to dance for joy.

At the time, it must have been one of the tenderest and tastiest slices of steak I had ever tasted.

So we asked the host what was the “secret” recipe for this steak. It turns out that the host’s wife had marinated the steak for two days. Therefore, by the time we ate it, the spices and enzymes had done their work, and the steak was unbelievable.

To be at their best, some things just need to marinate a bit before they’re ready to be “cooked” and served to the public. Some of your ideas would benefit from marinating in your mind a little before you serve them to the “public”. Some decisions—important decisions—need to marinate a bit before you make them.

Some of your ideas would benefit from marinating in your mind a little before you serve them to the “public”. Some decisions—important decisions—need to marinate a bit before you make them. Some of your projects still need a little more work (i.e. marination) before you launch them.

Sometimes, in our eagerness, we jump too hastily on something that we should have left alone (and let marinate a little): we should have waited before making some decisions; we should have thought it through a little more before launching the project; we should have gotten to know the person a little better before getting involved in a serious relationship with him or her.

Young people are particularly susceptible to this (not exclusively though): they want it, and they want it yesterday. No time to let it marinate. In their haste, they try to sell ice cubes in the north and fur coats in the south; they jump head first into a project without a “parachute”; they dive into a relationship, failing to realize that the relationship was still at the “lagoon” state (i.e. shallow).

Like a baby in its mother’s womb, some things just need that incubation period. Without that period, you put yourself and it (i.e. the project, the relationship, the idea, or what have you) at risk.

Let it marinate!

u8x7co8